The Very First British Columbia Ambulance Service Honour Guard flag

April 11, 2017

The Very First British Columbia Ambulance Service Honour Guard flag

Honour Guard Flag Presentation

On April 10th 2017 Barbara Fitzsimmons, the Chief Operating Officer of the BCEHS
presented Mike Wright, The Ceremonial Sergeant Major (CSM) of the BC Ambulance
Service Honour Guard, with the very first British Columbia Ambulance Service Honour
Guard flag.

Mellynn Graphics, a division of Quills Promotional Products in Victoria B.C., created the flag design. Several iterations of the design were vetted through the BCAS 10-7
Association Society, the BCEHS, and the BCAS Honour Guard leadership team. The

The final design, as pictured here was approved by the executive of the BCEHS for use of the official BC Ambulance Service Logo.

It was vital to have the flag 100% produced in Canada and this was accomplished by
FlagMart Canada, located in Edmonton Alberta. The company was exceptional in regard to customer service and worked closely with the designers on every detail of the flag.

The cost of producing the flag came from a donation made to the BCAS 10-7 Association Society for this specific purpose.

The flag will be a proud addition to the Guard in the performance of the many functions they attend each year as representatives of BC Ambulance Service.

In the photo (L) Barbara Fitzsimmons COO BCEHS, (M) Lynn Klein BCAS 10-7
Association Society and ( R) Mike Wright CSM BCAS Honour Guard. Photo taken in
front of the BCEHS Vancouver Island communication centre, which is also paramedic
station 109.

Photo by Deborah Price Photography

This article was written by Lynn Klein and shared with Flagmart Canada

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In the photo (L) Barbara Fitzsimmons COO BCEHS, (M) Lynn Klein BCAS 10-7  Association Society and ( R) Mike Wright CSM BCAS Honour Guard. Photo taken in  front of the BCEHS Vancouver Island communication centre, which is also paramedic  station 109.

 






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